Important safety information prescribing information for healthcare professionals

GET A CLEARER PICTURE.

Need help managing acne?

You’re in the right place for information on:

  • Tips for healthier, clearer skin
  • Causes of acne
  • Types of acne
  • Common acne myths

HEALTHY SKIN HOW-TOs.

  • Don't overdo it!

    Over-washing is no solution, and excessive scrubbing can make your acne worse.1 Try to limit washing your face to twice a day, and be gentle.1 Dry, red skin can make acne appear worse.1 Remember, everyone's skin is different.

  • Exfoliate? Gently.

    Use your fingertips to apply a non-abrasive, gentle formula that won't strip your skin.1 Using a washcloth, mesh, or other rough fabrics can irritate your skin.1 Talk to your dermatologist about products that work with your acne treatment.

  • Skin products with alcohol? Just say "no."

    Alcohol-free products are less likely to irritate your skin.1 Avoid using products on your face with high concentrations of isopropyl alcohol or common rubbing alcohol. This will help prevent dry, red skin—which can make acne look worse.1

  • Don't be picky.

    If you squeeze, pop, or pick your acne—with fingernails, pins, or anything else—your skin will take longer to clear up and you may be left with acne scars.1 In general, try not to touch your skin too much as this can cause flare-ups.1

  • Treat yourself.

    Even though there is no clear evidence that certain foods cause acne, try to maintain a healthy lifestyle, eat a well-balanced diet, stay hydrated, get plenty of sleep, and head to the gym every now and then.12 Your body will thank you.

CAUSES OF ACNE.

Acne is a chronic condition and the most common skin problem in the United States.2 It affects both men and women, and can happen at any age.3 It is characterized by whiteheads, blackheads, and inflamed red pimples—all of which can go by the endearing term, "zits."4,5

There are several factors that lead to the development of acne. These include inflammation, too much production of a skin oil called sebum, presence of bacteria, and the clogging of skin pores (follicles) with debris.3

Genetic predisposition could be a factor in adult acne.6

TYPES OF ACNE.

Acne can appear as several types of pimples, and they can be divided into two main categories, non-inflammatory and inflammatory.7 ACZONE® Gel, 7.5% treats 4 types of acne within these categories: open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), papules, and pustules.1,14 Knowing your acne can help you find a treatment that's right for you.

Non-inflammatory

Non-inflammatory pimples include blackheads and whiteheads, and are generally smaller and easier to treat.2,4,7 They develop when skin pores become plugged with oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria.4

Blackheads

Tiny dark spots caused by small plugs in pores that are open to the skin surface.4

Whiteheads

White raised bumps caused by pores that are closed at the surface and plugged with oil, debris, and bacteria.4

Inflammatory

Inflammatory pimples include papules and pustules.7 They develop when blocked pores get increasingly irritated and are more challenging to treat.4

Papules

Small, solid raised spots that occur when the walls of a distended pore break.4 Bacteria in the plugged pores attract white blood cells, causing inflammation.8

Pustules

Small, inflamed, pus-filled blister-like bumps on the skin’s surface.4

ACNE QUIZ

Take our quiz to get a clearer understanding about acne and your skin.

1/7
1

How many people are affected by acne in the United States?

a) 10-19 million
b) 20-29 million
c) 30-39 million
d) 40-50 million
e) everyone

40-50 Million

Acne is the most common skin problem in the United States—about 40 to 50 million people have it.2 It affects both men and women, and can happen at any age.3

Continue
2

Acne is a problem only teenagers face.

Myth
Truth

Myth

Although acne is common in teenagers, it isn’t just a teenage affiction.3,9 Adult acne may be more common than previously thought.9 About one-third of people seeking treatment for acne are 25 or older.9

Continue
3

Is there more than one type of acne?

Yes
No

Yes

Acne can appear as several types of pimples, and they can be divided into two main types: inflammatory and non‑inflammatory.7 Non‑inflammatory acne includes blackheads and whiteheads.2,7 Inflammatory acne includes papules and pustules, as well as more severe types of acne like nodules and cystic acne, which can be more difficult to treat.4,7,8 A dermatologist is the best resource to treat all types of acne. Talk to your dermatologist to learn more.

Continue
4

Which of the following factors have been linked to acne?

a) clogged pores
b) hormones
c) stress
d) all of the above

ALL OF THE ABOVE

The exact cause of acne is unknown, but doctors believe it results from several related factors, including bacteria and clogged pores, genetics and hormonal changes.8 Stress doesn’t cause acne directly, but research suggests that for people who have acne, stress can make it worse.8

Continue
5

What’s the optimal number of times to wash your face daily to help combat acne?

a) Once
b) Twice
c) Three times or more

Twice

The number of times you wash your face is important. Over-washing is no solution. Excessive scrubbing won’t make it go away.1 Try to limit washing your face to twice a day.1 Any more than this can leave your skin dry and irritated.

Continue
6

Being in the sun or getting a tan can help improve my acne.

Myth
Truth

MYTH

A sunburn that reddens the skin or suntan that darkens the skin may seem to temporarily make blemishes less visible and make the skin feel drier.8 However, these effects are only temporary and there are known risks of excessive sun exposure.8 Remember to always protect your skin with sunscreen, because your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside.10

Continue
7

Once my acne starts clearing up, I don’t have to keep on treating it.

Myth
Truth

MYTH

Because acne is a chronic condition, adhering to your treatment regimen is important even after you see an improvement in your acne.2,11 Talk to your dermatologist about ongoing treatment options that may be right for you.13

Continue

THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE QUIZ!

We hope this quiz helped improve your knowledge of acne. However, the best thing to do is have a conversation with your dermatologist.

What would you like to do?

Ready to take the next step?

Talk to your dermatologist. If you don't have one, find one here.

ACZONE® (dapsone) GEL, 7.5% IMPORTANT INFORMATION
APPROVED USE

ACZONE® (dapsone) Gel, 7.5% is a prescription medicine used on the skin (topical) to treat acne in people 12 years and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) or higher than normal levels of methemoglobin in your blood (methemoglobinemia).

Talk to your doctor about any medications you’re using, including topical benzoyl peroxide (BPO). Use of BPO with ACZONE® Gel may cause your skin and facial hair to temporarily turn yellow or orange at the site of application.

ACZONE® Gel 7.5% may cause serious side effects, including:

  • A decrease of oxygen in your blood caused by a certain type of abnormal red blood cell (methemoglobinemia). If your lips, nail beds, or the inside of your mouth turns gray or blue, stop using ACZONE® Gel 7.5% and get medical help right away.
  • A breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia) for some people with G6PD deficiency using ACZONE® Gel 7.5%. Stop using ACZONE® Gel 7.5%, and call your doctor right away if you get any of the following signs and symptoms: back pain, breathlessness, tiredness/weakness, dark‑brown urine, fever, or yellow or pale skin.

The most common side effects of ACZONE® Gel are dryness and itching of the skin being treated.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

Please click here for the full Product Information.

References:

1. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: Tips for managing. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

2. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne. Available at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/conditions. Accessed January 19, 2016.

3. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: who gets and causes. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

4. American Academy of Dermatology. Different kinds of pimples. Available at: https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/for-kids/about-skin/acne-pimples-and-zits/different-kinds-of-pimples. Accessed January 19, 2016.

5. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: pimples and zits. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/kids/skin/acne-pimples-zits. Accessed January 19, 2016.

6. Lucky AW, Dessinioti C, Katsambas AD. Adult Acne. In: Zouboulis CC, Katsambas AD, Kligman AM ed. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Acne and Rosacea. Berlin, Germany: Springer; 2014: 243-249

7. Bhambri S, Del Rosso JQ, Bhambri A. Pathogenesis of acne vulgaris: recent advances. J Drugs Dermatol. 2009; 8(7): 615-618.

8. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Questions and answers about acne. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/acne/. Accessed January 19, 2016.

9. Yentzer BA, Hick J, Reese EL, Uhas A, Feldman SR, Balkrishnan R. Acne vulgaris in the United States: a descriptive epidemiology. Cutis. 2010;86(2):94–99.

10. American Academy of Dermatology. How to apply sunscreen. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/spot-skin-cancer/learn-about-skin-cancer/prevent/how-to-apply-sunscreen. Accessed January 19, 2016.

11. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: diagnosis and treatment. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

12. Magin P, Pond D, Smith W, Watson A. A systematic review of the evidence for ‘myths and misconceptions’ in acne management: diet, face-washing and sunlight. Family Practice. 2005;22:62-70.

13. Friedman PM, Jih MH, Kimyai-Asadi A, Goldberg LH. Treatment of Inflammatory facial acne vulgaris with the 1450-nm diode laser: a pilot study. Dermatol Surg. 2004; 30(2 Pt 1):147-151.

14. Data on file, Allergan, 2015.

ACZONE® (dapsone) Gel, 7.5% is a prescription medicine used on the skin (topical) to treat acne in people 12 years and older.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) or higher than normal levels of methemoglobin in your blood (methemoglobinemia).

Talk to your doctor about any medications you’re using, including topical benzoyl peroxide (BPO). Use of BPO with ACZONE ® Gel may cause your skin and facial hair to temporarily turn yellow or orange at the site of application.

ACZONE® Gel 7.5% may cause serious side effects, including:

  • A decrease of oxygen in your blood caused by a certain type of abnormal red blood cell (methemoglobinemia). If your lips, nail beds, or the inside of your mouth turns gray or blue, stop using ACZONE® Gel 7.5% and get medical help right away.
  • A breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia) for some people with G6PD deficiency using ACZONE® Gel 7.5%. Stop using ACZONE® Gel 7.5%, and call your doctor right away if you get any of the following signs and symptoms: back pain, breathlessness, tiredness/weakness, dark-brown urine, fever, or yellow or pale skin.

The most common side effects of ACZONE® Gel are dryness and itching of the skin being treated.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please click here for the full Product Information.

References:

1. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: Tips for managing. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

2. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne. Available at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/conditions. Accessed January 19, 2016.

3. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: who gets and causes. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

4. American Academy of Dermatology. Different kinds of pimples. Available at: https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/for-kids/about-skin/acne-pimples-and-zits/different-kinds-of-pimples. Accessed January 19, 2016.

5. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: pimples and zits. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/kids/skin/acne-pimples-zits. Accessed January 19, 2016.

6. Lucky AW, Dessinioti C, Katsambas AD. Adult Acne. In: Zouboulis CC, Katsambas AD, Kligman AM ed. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Acne and Rosacea. Berlin, Germany: Springer; 2014: 243-249

7. Bhambri S, Del Rosso JQ, Bhambri A. Pathogenesis of acne vulgaris: recent advances. J Drugs Dermatol. 2009; 8(7): 615-618.

8. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Questions and answers about acne. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/acne/. Accessed January 19, 2016.

9. Yentzer BA, Hick J, Reese EL, Uhas A, Feldman SR, Balkrishnan R. Acne vulgaris in the United States: a descriptive epidemiology. Cutis. 2010;86(2):94–99.

10. American Academy of Dermatology. How to apply sunscreen. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/spot-skin-cancer/learn-about-skin-cancer/prevent/how-to-apply-sunscreen. Accessed January 19, 2016.

11. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: diagnosis and treatment. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne. Accessed January 19, 2016.

12. Magin P, Pond D, Smith W, Watson A. A systematic review of the evidence for ‘myths and misconceptions’ in acne management: diet, face-washing and sunlight. Family Practice. 2005;22:62-70.

13. Friedman PM, Jih MH, Kimyai-Asadi A, Goldberg LH. Treatment of Inflammatory facial acne vulgaris with the 1450-nm diode laser: a pilot study. Dermatol Surg. 2004; 30(2 Pt 1):147-151.

14. Data on file, Allergan, 2015.